Tudor LiteratureThis is a featured page

Welcome to the Tudor Literature section of the Everything Tudor wiki! Explore the world of Tudor Literature using the links below:
Tudor Non-Fiction Tudor Fiction

-Learn about Tudor non-fiction on Henry VIII, his Six Wives, Elizabeth I and more!

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-Find out more about authors like Alison Weir, Eric Ives, David Starkey and others!

-Learn about interesting and original fiction pertaining to the Tudors!

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-Discover more about authors like Jean Plaidy, Alison Weir, Philippa Gregory, Kate Emerson, and others!
For individual titles on individual people, check out the Everything Tudor Non-fiction page.
For individual titles on individual people, check out the Everything Tudor Fiction page.

*Don't forget to check out the Tudor Book Club! Join us for reading and discussions on Tudor literature!




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CarolynHarris Sister Queens 0 Mar 21 2012, 1:57 AM EDT by CarolynHarris
Thread started: Mar 21 2012, 1:57 AM EDT  Watch
A very interesting book

http://www.royalhistorian.com/the-tudor-book-reviews-1-sister-queens-the-noble-tragic-lives-of-katherine-of-aragon-and-juana-queen-of-castile/
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MadameDarque Tudor Books That Should Be Written (page: 1 2) 21 Jun 25 2011, 8:10 AM EDT by stumattana
Thread started: Mar 27 2011, 3:11 PM EDT  Watch
All right, so the market is somewhat saturated. But I still think there are people and events of the Tudor period that are underrepresented in fiction and non-fiction. What books on the Tudors do you think should be published? I'll start with one idea:

Fiction: I would love, love, love to see a Wolf Hall-style novel about William Cecil, Lord Burghley. He's one of my favorite Tudor characters, but he's almost as much of an enigma as Elizabeth herself. There are a lot of contradictions in his personality; a virtuous public servant with a talent for realpolitik; the family man with a ruthless streak. I want to learn more about his private life--his relationships with his wife Mildred Cooke (who was ranked with Lady Jane Grey as one of the most learned ladies in England) and his children, his rivalry with Robert Dudley, his mentoring of Francis Walsingham, and of course, his relationship with Elizabeth. What were his childhood and education like? What was his vision for England's future?

Some of these questions could be answered by a good biography, I suppose. I've read parts of Read's three volumes on Cecil and public policy, but they're rather dry and a bit dated. I'm buying myself the David Loades book on the Cecils for my birthday, so hopefully it will be more illuminating with regard to Cecil's character.
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MadameDarque Tudor plays 2 Mar 5 2011, 1:31 AM EST by robertparry
Thread started: Oct 14 2010, 10:17 AM EDT  Watch
So I thought it would be interesting to compile a list of dramatic works about the Tudors, many of which were adapted into movies we know--I was wondering if people could add to it?

Mary Stuart by Frederich Schiller (recently had a well-received revival on Broadway.)
A Man for All Seasons by Robert Bolt
Vivat! Vivat Regina! by Robert Bolt
Henry VIII by William Shakespeare
Elizabeth the Queen by Maxwell Anderson (I think this was the inspiration for the Bette Davis movie)
Anne of the Thousand Days by Maxwell Anderson
I also think there are a few operas, but the only one I can think of off the top of my head is Maria Stuart, based on the Schiller play.

Schiller's Mary Stuart is actually an interesting one to talk about--I recently bought the audiobook. It's undoubtedly a fantastic work of drama, but I wasn't wild about the (rather sexist, I thought) characterization, especially that of Elizabeth. Being published in 1800, I think it also pretty much singlehandedly started the a-historical trope of Mary Stuart as the victimized and romantic martyr. Has anyone else seen it? The Broadway production looked awesome.
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